Why Integrated Graphics isn’t Good Enough

Integrated Graphics have been around for a long time and have been what new and extremely budget-oriented gamers play on. But they’re usually not the best when it comes to gaming and it’s often recommended to get a Discrete Graphics Card. Why is that though? Why does the Integrated GPU or iGPU suck so much and why don’t they get more powerful?

iGPU Space on Intel CPU
Credit: Techquickie

GPUs take a lot of die space. Die space is what the board is made of, its what has all your processor units and transistors. The CPU has its own die space and adding a GPU to it is not easy. Not to mention, powerful GPUs require a lot of power and cooling. Yes, cooling.

Cooling is a very important aspect of a GPU as most of them have a minimum of at least one fan along with a heatsink, the metal part that transfers the heat from the processor of the GPU or CPU to the fan. Adding a strong iGPU means that it will produce a lot of heat. Getting rid of that heat is a challenge and just not worth the hassle.

Triple Fan Cooling on GPU

Another reason is because of the type of memory that iGPUs and discrete GPUs use. iGPUs use your system’s memory whereas a discrete GPU has its own VRAM that it uses. This is faster as its only purpose is to aid the GPU so it doesn’t share its resources.

Now, as technology has improved over time, CPUs have gotten faster and more power-efficient. There are also tons of more transistors on a chip now. With this advancement, we’ve seen better iGPUs, especially from AMD with the Ryzen 3200G and 3400G. These are termed as APU’s(Accelerated Processing Unit) by AMD and feature the CPU and GPU on a single die.

Source: Hardware Unboxed

Now integrated graphics are not for high-end gaming. For older games and for esports titles, an iGPU can do fairly well on low settings and a lower resolution. AMD’s APUs and Intel’s new iGPUs have improved to a point where you can play esports titles at 1080p 60fps or more which is great for those who are looking to getting into gaming.

But other than that, if you want to move up and start playing games that are more intense and resource-hungry, you will have to get a discrete GPU. Even a budget card like a GTX 1650 will be sufficient enough to play games like GTA V, PUBG PC, Fortnite, Rainbow Six Siege and Apex Legends on 1080p and above 60fps.

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AMD Ryzen 3 3200G ‘Picasso’ APU Spotted Online

We already know that AMD is working on range of Ryzen 3000 processors, which it plans to reveal around Computex next month. But thanks to another leak, we have our eyes on one of the upcoming Ryzen 3 APUs, the 3200G.

The leak comes on the Chinese forum Chiphell, and includes images of the Ryzen 3 3200G APU. Codenamed ‘Picasso’ the Ryzen 3000 APU series will be based on the 12nm Zen+ architecture, different from the Ryzen 3000 CPUs that will be based on the 7nm Zen 2 architecture.

The Ryzen 3 3200G will of course, replace the Ryzen 3 2200G from the current APU line up, and similarly we can expect a Ryzen 5 too, that will replace the current Ryzen 5 2400G. Based on the leaked specs, the Ryzen 3 3200G will feature a base clock speed of 3.6GHz and will boost up to 3.9 GHz. We can assume that the core will be the same, if not better, so we should see a 4 core, 4 thread APU. It will also feature Vega 10 onboard graphics, clocked at 1250 MHz, while the Ryzen 3 2200G was relatively lower at 1100 MHz.

The Ryzen 3 3000 laptop CPUs and APUs were revealed by AMD earlier this year, where Lisa Su also demonstrated an unnamed Ryzen 3 3000 desktop CPU going toe to toe with Intel’s high-end consumer processor. And now, we can expect to see something about the APU versions as well. Motherboard manufacturers have already started announcing the support for upcoming processors on the present AM4 boards, with BIOS updates. Now, all that’s left to see is how AMD plans to reveal and launch the upcoming 7nm Zen 2 processors and the 12nm Zen+ APUs this year. Considering that Lisa Su is supposed to give the opening keynote at Computex, which is just a month away, it seems like we’ll get to hear some big news from the red team really soon.

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More performance as AMD releases official drivers for mobile Ryzen chips

One common complaint of Ryzen powered laptop owners is ‘no official’ drivers from AMD. This issue was also addressed by AMD at the CES and the company seem determined to resolve the issue. Well, finally the mobile-Ryzen owners can enjoy the improved support they have been waiting for.

AMD has made the existing Adrenaline drivers compatible with it mobile Ryzen series. The ‘Adrenaline’ drivers were initially released for AMD’s desktop APUs, which are also based on the Raven Bridge architecture.

As per the new 19.2.3 driver’s release notes, it offers a significant increase in gaming performance. AMD claims a 10 percent performance boost on an average, with eSports titles enjoying 17 percent average performance increase.
All this performance optimisation could turn an unplayable game into a playable one.

AMD’s Release Notes.

AMD tested various popular games. The test result yielded varying results, with increase in performance across the board. Here is an interesting footnote that accompanied the release notes.

“Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of February 19, 2019 on the AMD Ryzen 5 2500U comprising of 12GB DDR4-2400 and Windows 10×64.PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. Counter Strike: Global Offensive, Fortnite, Player Unknown’s Battleground, and World of Warcraft when running Radeon™ Software Adrenalin 2019 Edition 19.2.3 scored: 52, 30, 26, 43 FPS respectively. Radeon™ Software 17.40 scored 43,25,24,38 respectively. Therefore, in the above comparison, Radeon™ Software Adrenalin 2019 Edition 19.2.3 shows 23%, 22%, 10%, 15% greater performance. For an average of 17% performance gains across the titles. All scores are an average of 3 runs with the same settings. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RS-286″

Find the official release notes here. Happy gaming!

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